How Samsung Inspires Youth to Innovate


In celebration of National Children’s Day, Samsung is proud to shine a light on the DIY STEM program offered at Boys & Girls Clubs of America, which exposes youth to scientific principles with real world applications that serves as the entry-point for youth’s STEM learning experience at the Clubs. The program’s goal is to inspire kids’ curiosity in STEM subjects and prepare young people for 21st century success.

“You will see them. They just — they light up and it’s incredibly rewarding,” said Amanda Grutza, STEM facilitator at the Variety Boys & Girls Club in Long Island City, Queens. The club is one of many Boys & Girls Clubs offering the DIY STEM curriculum sponsored by Samsung.


Boys & Girls Club members utilize Samsung donated tablets to follow the DIY STEM activity instructions for each project.


Some of Grutza’s star students have taken such an interest in the STEM-focused activities involving robotics, energy and electricity, engineering design, food chemistry, aeronautics and the science of sports that they have now become student teachers in her classroom, helping the younger Club members learn.

“When I help a student with things that I teach, it feels good to me,” explained Gavin U., a DIY STEM student teacher at the Club. “It makes me feel happy that they’re learning new things.”

Grutza says as a result of the increased exposure to STEM subjects some of her students have already expressed ambitions to become scientists in the future.

“At Samsung, we are committed to inspiring youth’s interest in STEM and enriching their lives in a way that makes a real impact on our youth as they look to their futures,” said Ann Woo, Senior Director of Corporate Citizenship, Samsung Electronics America. “We share Boys & Girls Clubs’ same passion and dedication to helping children realize their dreams and explore future careers in STEM fields.”

DIY STEM engages Club youth ages 9 to 12 in different elements of STEM each week. The project-based STEM program is a key component of Boys & Girls Clubs of America’s engineering pathways, and it provides youth opportunities for critical thinking and peer exchange.


Amanda Grutz (center), DIY STEM facilitator at the Variety Boys & Girls Club in Long Island City, Queens, demonstrates how the “Art Bot” will work after the children build their own.

Media Contact:

Bernadette Brijlall

(Corporate Communications (US)) b.brijlall@sea.samsung.com

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