Samsung Invites Teachers to Help Their Students “Solve for Tomorrow” through STEAM Competition

Eighth annual contest empowers students to use critical thinking and creative problem solving to address real-world challenges

 

 

RIDGEFIELD PARK, N.J. – September 14, 2017 Samsung today announced the launch of the Samsung Solve for Tomorrow Contest, welcoming U.S. public school teachers who teach in public schools including Charter Schools that are 50% or more publicly funded to submit ideas on how their students can use STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts and math) to address a real-world problem in their community.

Solve for Tomorrow aims to raise awareness and enthusiasm for STEAM subjects among students in 6th-12th grade. Solve for Tomorrow was created to help close that gap and inspire the future innovators of this growing sector. Economic experts estimate that the U.S. will need approximately one million more STEAM professionals than it will produce at the current rate over the next decade*.

At the Samsung Solve for Tomorrow National Finalist Pitch Event on Tuesday, April 25, 2017 in Washington, D.C., teacher Justin Reinmuth and students Elexus Johnson and Eric Crane of Gering High School in Gering, Neb. discuss their STEAM project – a drone-powered spraying system to target weeds and use fewer chemicals on crops – with contest judge Elliot Mork of Project Lead the Way.

At the Samsung Solve for Tomorrow National Finalist Pitch Event on Tuesday, April 25, 2017 in Washington, D.C., teacher Justin Reinmuth and students Elexus Johnson and Eric Crane of Gering High School in Gering, Neb. discuss their STEAM project – a drone-powered spraying system to target weeds and use fewer chemicals on crops – with contest judge Elliot Mork of Project Lead the Way.

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“While there’s a growing chasm between education and career opportunities, there’s no shortage of students who are excited to creatively address problems they see every day – it’s a matter of helping them draw connections between STEAM and the real world,” said Ann Woo, Senior Director of Corporate Citizenship, Samsung Electronics America. “The Samsung Solve for Tomorrow Contest gets students engaged through hands-on learning to empower the student who already has their eyes set on a future in STEAM, as well as inspire the student who never previously considered it. We encourage teachers to enter this contest and to engage their students on this journey.”

The $2 million** contest awards schools in every U.S. state and the District of Columbia, recognizing hundreds of schools throughout the phased program for their achievements. Today through Thursday, November 9, 2017, teachers can enter the contest online by answering three simple questions detailing how their student will use STEAM to combat a local challenge. From environmental to health, safety to nutrition, equality to poverty, and more – any matter that’s important to students and their communities can be submitted to the contest.

Snowflake Junior High School students Corynn Cottrell and Dylan Neff, and teacher Michael Eilertsen meet Senator Jeff Flake while in Washington, DC on Wednesday, April 26, 2017 for the Samsung Solve for Tomorrow Awards where the school was named a 2017 national winner.

Snowflake Junior High School students Corynn Cottrell and Dylan Neff, and teacher Michael Eilertsen meet Senator Jeff Flake while in Washington, DC on Wednesday, April 26, 2017 for the Samsung Solve for Tomorrow Awards where the school was named a 2017 national winner.

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“As a teacher, I’m always looking for new ways to get my students excited about the curriculum, and last year, it was Samsung Solve for Tomorrow that made all the difference,” said Michael Eilertsen, teacher at Snowflake Junior High School in Ariz. and a 2017 national winner. “My students not only fostered the critical thinking skills they need for future careers, they also had an active role in safeguarding the people and wildlife in our community.”

New this year, Samsung has created a referral giveaway program to get all public school employees involved. While only teachers of 6th-12th grade may enter the contest, employees at U.S. public schools can refer their educator colleagues to complete a contest submission and they will be entered for a chance to win a Samsung Galaxy Note8 or Samsung 65” TV. Teachers must name their referrer in their application, and Samsung will randomly select five referral winners.***

Since 2002, Samsung has provided more than $46 million to more than 1,000 public schools and community organizations in the United States through its many citizenship initiatives. To enter the contest, and for contest rules, please visit www.samsung.com/solve and follow us on Instagram @SolveforTomorrow for the latest updates.

*President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology, Engage to excel: producing one million additional college graduates with degrees in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (Executive Office of the President of the United States, 2012).
**$2 million prize is based on an estimated retail value.
***Not open to the general public: No purchase necessary to enter or win. Open to employees at eligible schools in the fifty (50) United States/DC twenty one (21) years of age or older. To enter/official rules: share the Contest with other educators by directing them to www.Samsung.com/Solve to complete the application form including referral fields with all required information. Referrals may come from teachers, administrators or faculty members. Sponsor: Samsung Electronics America, Inc., 85 Challenger Rd., Ridgefield Park, NJ 07660 Void where prohibited. Ends 11/9/17.
For complete contest rules, please visit www.Samsung.com/Solve.

 

Media Contact:

Brenna Eller

(Corporate Communications - US) b.eller@sea.samsung.com

Jessica Dunten

(Allison+Partners for Samsung) 1-646-428-0610 SamsungSFT@allisonpr.com

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